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Cannabis Education

CBD Prescription Drug Is No Longer A Federally Controlled Substance

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has removed a marijuana-based medication from the list of federally controlled substances.

GW Pharmaceuticals announced on Monday that Epidiolex, a prescription drug it developed that’s derived from cannabis and used in the treatment of epilepsy, had been taken off Schedule V of the Controlled Substances Act. Effectively immediately, the CBD medication is no longer a controlled substance, the company said.

That means individuals will be able to more easily obtain Epidiolex. GW said in its notice that it will “begin the process of implementing these changes at the state level and through the EPIDIOLEX distribution network.”

After that point, state reporting requirements under prescription drug monitoring programs will no longer be applicable. Like many non-controlled drugs, people will still need to get a prescription from a doctor, but those prescriptions will be valid for up to a year and can be transferred among pharmacies.

“This notification from DEA fully establishes that EPIDIOLEX, the only CBD medicine approved by FDA, is no longer a controlled substance under the federal Controlled Substances Act,” Justin Gover, CEO of GW, said in a press release. “We would like to thank DEA for confirming the non-controlled status of this medicine.”

“Importantly, the descheduling of EPIDIOLEX has the potential to further ease patient access to this important therapy for patients living with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome and Dravet syndrome, two of the most debilitating forms of epilepsy,” he said.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the medication in 2018. DEA said it would be placed in Schedule V, rather than Schedule I like marijuana and its derivatives.

FDA pushed back in a letter to the agency, arguing that CBD carries minimal risks and has established health benefits and so it shouldn’t be controlled at all. DEA replied that international treaty obligations warrant its control, albeit in the least restrictive category of Schedule V. FDA then said that if that changed, the agency should “promptly” revisit its status as a controlled substance.

Last year, the World Health Organization clarified that CBD containing no more than 0.2 percent THC is “not under international control.”

Meanwhile, FDA is in the process of developing regulations for hemp-derived cannabidiol products that aren’t approved as medications following the 2018 Farm Bill’s legalization of the crop and its derivatives. The agency said in a report to Congress last month that the rulemaking process is ongoing, but it is actively exploring pathways to allow for lawful sales of the cannabis compound as a dietary supplement, and it’s developing enforcement discretion guidance for products that are currently on the market.

Featured image from Shutterstock


This article has been republished from Marijuana Moment under a content-sharing agreement. Read the original article here.



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Cannabis Education Videos

Markus Weg zur Cannabismedizin | Drug Education Agency (163)



In dieser letzten Folge des Jahres 2019 eurer DEA erzählt Gastgeber Markus Berger von seinem Weg als Cannabispatient. Vor Kurzem erkämpfte Markus vor dem Sozialgericht nach drei Jahren Prozess erfolgreich die Kostenübernahme seiner medizinischen Cannabisblüten durch die Krankenkasse. Ein beschwerlicher und steiniger Weg – der sich gelohnt hat. Wie er das gemacht hat und welche Probleme er dabei hatte, erzählt er in dieser Ausgabe eurer DEA. Ein Fall, der womöglich auch anderen helfen kann.

Die DEA wird möglich gemacht durch NEAR DARK Smoking Paraphernalia: http://www.neardark.de

DEA-Fanartikel gibt es bei BLACK LEAF: http://www.blackleaf.de

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Cannabis Education Videos

Ep. 03 Preview: Drug Education, Adolescent Cannabis Use, and Harm Reduction Strategies



This is a clip from episode 3 of the Curious About Cannabis Podcast where we explore the issue of drug education in the United States, adolescent Cannabis use, and what users can do to minimize the risks associated with Cannabis.

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed by our guests or host are their own and do not represent any agency, organization, employer, or company, including Curious About Cannabis and Natural Learning Enterprises, LLC.

All information presented is for educational purposes only and should not be interpreted as medical advice. Always seek help from a medical professional if you are seeking guidance for treating a medical condition.

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You can find the Curious About Cannabis podcast at http://www.CACpodcast.com, or on Spotify, Stitcher, Apple Podcasts (iTunes), Blubrry, and almost anywhere else you may listen to podcasts.

The Curious About Cannabis book is available at http://www.CuriousAboutCannabisBook.com

The Curious About Cannabis learning initiative is produced by Natural Learning Enterprises, a science education company dedicated to the enhancement of public scientific literacy through education about the natural world. Learn more about Natural Learning Enterprises at http://www.NaturalLearningEnterprises.com

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Cannabis Training Videos

Can a Trained Drug Dog tell the difference between Hemp and Marijuana?!



I had the pleasure of attending a training held at my local police department and I was able to see the ability the Dogs have to distinguish between marijuana high in thc and Hemp high in CBD.
The dog was super smart and had the ability to tell the difference.
The dog was trained using Hemp and has visited local farms.

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Cannabis Education

Drug Rehab Experts Find Medical Marijuana Helpful, but with Risks

Ninety-three percent of Americans support legalizing medical marijuana. Now, thanks to new research, a sizable majority of substance abuse clinicians do, too.

Even though drug misuse professionals broadly back cannabis’s medical value, they also see risks associated with its use.

“While most participants agreed that medical marijuana should be legalized and that its ‘responsible’ use was ‘safe,’ ” the study concluded, “they also believed that it is often abused and has not been studied adequately. Consistent with prior research, we found that fewer addictions treatment professionals (approximately 70%) than members of the public supported legalization of marijuana for medical purposes.”

Generally speaking, many medical professionals who treat substance use disorders (SUD) believe abstinence from recreational drugs is the best practice. This new study, which published in early July 2019 in the Journal of Substance Use, aimed to get a better understanding of where they stood on the medical use of marijuana.

“Given that negative attitudes toward patients, regardless of the reason, may result in premature treatment termination and poorer-quality care, it seems important to understand attitudes toward legalization of medical marijuana among SUD treatment professionals,” the researchers from Towson University in Maryland wrote.

Participants were asked to rate how much they agreed or disagreed with 22 statements, including:

  • Marijuana is safe when used responsibly for medical purposes.
  • Medical marijuana is often abused.
  • A client can be in substance use disorder treatment when using medical marijuana.
  • Marijuana can help reduce withdrawal symptoms.
  • Taking marijuana instead of other drugs is only replacing one addiction with another.

They were also asked to share their personal history with cannabis and whether they knew anyone who had used medical marijuana.

A total of 966 addiction clinicians completed the survey between February and May 2018. They were identified through professional certification boards in Alaska, Kansas, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Carolina, Rhode Island, West Virginia, and Wisconsin.

Most reported having used marijuana (74%), knowing a medical cannabis patient (73%), and knowing patients with addiction issues who’d used cannabis in their recovery (61%).

Additionally, most respondents thought marijuana should be legalized for medical purposes and that its use was safe, though only 38% said it was “not detrimental to one’s health.” Sixty-four percent said they believed medical cannabis is often abused.

Via Journal of Substance Use

Interestingly, however, many participants agreed that cannabis, including products that contain cannabidiol (CBD), could help with symptoms associated with addiction, such as anxiety and insomnia. While 70% said consuming marijuana is “trading one addiction for another,” most also thought it was acceptable for a person in SUD treatment to use medical marijuana.

“Overall,” the study‘s authors note, “our results suggest that addictions treatment providers have mixed opinions about medical marijuana legalization.”

Among the factors that appeared to influence participants’ attitudes toward medical marijuana were age — younger professionals were more open to the idea — past experience consuming cannabis and personal knowledge of someone who’d used cannabis for therapeutic purposes. Providers on the East Coast also viewed medical marijuana more favorably than in other parts of the country.

“These mixed attitudes may actually reflect a healthy skepticism,” researchers conclude. “That is, if the current trends continue, addictions treatment professionals may be poised to both accept medical marijuana legalization and to handle any associated negative consequences.”


Featured Image: About 70% of drug abuse treatment professionals support medical marijuana legalization, but also fear the plant could be abused and has not been studied enough for its medicinal benefits. (Weedmaps News file photo)

This article was republished from Marijuana Moment under a content syndication agreement. Read the original article here. 



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How to Prepare for Drug Tests and Get THC Out of Your System

Pursuing a new job can be both an exciting and nerve-wracking experience, but for cannabis users or anyone considering using cannabis, it can also induce the gut-wrenching fear of an unexpected drug test followed by a frantic search for quick ways to do a marijuana cleanse.

Even in states with medical or adult-use cannabis legalization in full swing, some jobs still maintain stringent drug policies that forbid employees from consuming cannabis on their own time.

Having advance notice of an upcoming drug test may give you enough time to take a tolerance break and abstain from consuming, regardless it’s important to understand how THC operates throughout the body and how to healthily and effectively move cannabinoids out of your system.

How Does THC Move Through the Body?

You might have heard rumors that cannabis can stay in your system for days, weeks, or maybe even months, but the way THC travels and interacts with the body paints a slightly more complex picture.

If cannabis is smoked or vaporized, THC enters the bloodstream from the lungs and goes directly to the heart, where it is then pumped throughout the body to the two types of cannabinoid receptors found in the human body.

“THC travels in the blood to the CB1 receptors located in the brain and central nervous system, and the CB2 receptors located in the spleen and immune system,” said Itzhak Kurerk, Ph.D., CEO and co-founder of Cannformatics, a Northern California biotech company researching improvements to medical cannabis.

THC molecules binding to the cannabinoid receptor.

Every time the blood circulates throughout the body, a certain portion of THC passes through the liver. When THC is broken down in the liver, it forms at least 80 different metabolites, including 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), both of which are inactive forms of THC that remain in the body far longer than active THC. Some of these metabolites, such as THC-COOH, are stored in body fat and gradually eliminated from the body through urine and feces.

“Tests for cannabis consumption mainly detect a metabolite of THC found in urine,” Kurek explained. “This metabolite [THC-COOH] is a result of the detoxification process in the liver by cytochrome P450 enzymes and further oxidation.”

When cannabis is ingested in the form of an edible or capsule, THC enters the bloodstream through the walls of the stomach and intestine. THC will travel directly to the liver where a substantial amount is eliminated or metabolized before the cannabinoid receptors are activated. After that, the remaining THC and its corresponding metabolites are put into circulation by the heart, where they both reach the brain.

So, contrary to what some might think, most cannabis drug tests aren’t only specifically looking for THC, but also metabolites such as THC-COOH that are created as the cannabinoid is rapidly broken down in the body.

Types of Drug Tests

Currently, there are drug screening methods designed to detect the presence of THC and THC metabolites in urine, blood, saliva, and hair.

Urine

A urine test is the preferred method used to screen for cannabis use, as this is the recommended test by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), a branch of the U.S Department of Health and Human Services that creates drug testing standards for government employees.

A 2012 study published in the Iranian Journal of Psychiatry explained why urine tests are more effective than blood, saliva, or hair. “Urine is the preferred sample because of higher concentration and longer detection time of metabolites in it. Moreover, urine can easily be sampled,” the study stated.

Urine drug tests have a specific sensitivity regarding the cutoff concentration of THC-COOH, the benchmark used to determine the results of the test. While the cutoff point can generally range from 15 nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL) to 100ng/mL, the most common cutoff used for urine tests is 50 ng/mL, which is the value recommended by SAMHSA. This cutoff concentration determines the timeframe that a drug test will show up positive or negative for cannabis use. To fully grasp the finite scope of this cutoff limit measurement, consider that a nanogram is one-billionth of a gram, while a milliliter measures fluid volume equal to 1/1,000 of a liter. In the case of a marijuana drug screening, the test results would be positive if the amount of THC metabolites in the sample exceeded 50 ng/mL.

Blood

The researchers from the same 2012 study also stated that blood tests can only detect cannabis use a few hours after consumption.

“Maximum delta-9-THC plasma concentration was observed approximately 8 minutes after onset of smoking, while 11-OH-THC peaked at 15 minutes and THC-COOH at 81 minutes. This delta-9-THC concentration rapidly decreases to 1-4 ng/mL within 3-4 hours,” the study stated.

Saliva

Cannabis use can also be detected in saliva, but this also has a more limited window. A 2014 review on cannabinoids in oral fluid found that THC could be detected in occasional users one to three days after use, while saliva in chronic users could be detected up to 29 days after use.

Hair

Hair tests are the most sensitive type of drug tests, and can detect THC and THC-COOH up to 90 days after consumption. But these tests have proven to be inaccurate, and even non-consumers could trigger a false positive if they come into contact with a cannabis user. A 2015 study published in Scientific Reports, bluntly titled “Finding cannabinoids in hair does not prove cannabis consumption,” stated: “At first glance, differentiation of the route of THC-COOH incorporation into hair seems irrelevant as long as positive THC-COOH findings in hair require THC uptake by the individual under investigation. However, considering the presence of THC-COOH in sebum/sweat, a transfer to other persons’ hair is possible.”

How Long Does it Take for THC to Move Out of Your System?

As for the question of how long THC can be detected in your system, it depends not only on the type of drug tests, but also relies on a variety of individual factors, such as the consumer’s metabolism and amount of cannabis used.  

“How long cannabis stays in your system is still an open question, and depends on many factors,” Kurek explained. “Experiments on frequent cannabis users have found residual THC can be detected for 5-13 days post-consumption.”

There are a variety of factors that might impact the amount of time that THC will stay in your system, including:

    • Dosage: The greater the amount of THC, the longer it will take the body to detoxify and excrete THC and its metabolites.
    • Frequency of use: How much and for how long does a  consumer use marijuana?
    • Genetics: People inherit different variants of the cytochrome P450 superfamily of enzymes, which modify THC in the body resulting in excretion in the urine, according to Kurek.
    • Sex: Some studies have shown that men who smoke marijuana may have higher circulating levels of THC than women.
    • Weight: The more body fat the cannabis user has, more THC metabolites are stored in the body and for longer periods.
    • Metabolism: What’s the rate at which the body can eliminate the presence of cannabis from the system?

Although we’ve established that there’s no clear cut answer on how long it takes to get THC out of your system, past research on THC detection methods allows us to estimate the time it takes to cleanse the body of marijuana.

A 2005 review by Paul Cary, director of the Toxicology and Drug Monitoring Laboratory at the University of Missouri, found that while detection times in excess of 30 days do occur in some cases, they are largely an exception. The study acknowledges the various factors that determine how long THC metabolites remain in the body, but also provides “practical cannabinoid detection guidance” to offer a general idea of how long marijuana will stay in an individual’s system.  

“Based upon recent scientific evidence, at the 50 ng/mL cutoff concentration for the detection of cannabinoids in urine (using the currently available laboratory-based screening methods) it would be unlikely for a chronic user to produce a positive urine drug test result for longer than 10 days after the last smoking episode,” the study stated.  

At a lower 20 ng/mL cutoff concentration, the study also states that it would be uncommon for a chronic marijuana smoker to produce a positive urine drug test result longer than 21 days after consumption. For those who only use cannabis occasionally, the review states that it would be unusual for cannabinoids to be detected in urine three to four days after consumption at the 50 ng/mL cutoff level. For one-time marijuana use, the most stringent 20 ng/mL cutoff concentration point shouldn’t detect cannabinoids after 7 days.

Using a specified cutoff concentration point and time frame, drug testing laboratories are essentially able to look at levels of THC metabolites and figure out the last time the subject used cannabis.

“If the lab quantitates how much THC-11-hydroxy or THC-11-carboxy is found, that can be used to date when your last use of THC was, approximately,” explained Dr. Joseph Morgan, Senior Medical Director at Onconova Therapeutics, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing small-molecule drug candidates to treat cancer.

“In other words, somebody who tests for no THC, no 11-hydroxy-THC, and a small amount of 11-carboxy-THC [THC-COOH], they can reliably say they were not stoned at the time of the test, and most likely their most recent use was at least a week before, possibly even one or 2 months before,” he added.

While these guidances help construct a framework for the court system and employers to follow, random drug screenings have a tendency of catching cannabis users by surprise. In the event you have a surprise drug test coming up and you’re unsure whether you still have THC in your system, it’s possible to give your body a marijuana cleanse that is legal and healthy.  

Easy, Ethical Ways to Do a Marijuana Cleanse

It might be hard to admit, but the most effective way to give your body a marijuana cleanse is simple: Don’t consume any cannabis for one to three months. If abstaining from THC is not an option for you, know that because the most common type of drug test is a urine screening, the terms “marijuana cleanse” or “detox” typically refer to cleaning THC metabolites out of urine until they’re undetectable.  

First, don’t try to cheat a drug screening under any circumstances, especially not by purchasing fake urine or other strange products that could get you into trouble,” Morgan warns of the risk of using products that supply fake chemical urine. “If you’re found doing that, then they’ll know you’re obviously guilty of something,” he said.

There are plenty of detox products that claim to assist with a marijuana cleanse, but keep in mind that these detox methods may not be 100% effective. One popular way to detoxify the body is by using bentonite clay, a clay made from volcanic ash that is purported to absorb toxicants, chemicals, and other impurities from the body. It can be used internally by mixing some into a glass of water.

Outside of detox formulas, there are other effective practices you can integrate into your daily routine. Focus on things like physical health, vitamin and food intake, while also recognizing how THC metabolites enter the urine. Morgan added an important caveat, explaining that exercising a day or two before a drug screening could cause THC-COOH to be released from fat cells into the urine stream.

“Try to be healthy and not fat, be well-hydrated, but don’t exercise vigorously the day before or the day of your drug test,” Morgan explained.



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Cannabis Education Videos

Voices for Humanity: Meth, Cannabis, Heroin Drug Education, Drug-Free Czech Republic



Watch ‘Voices for Humanity: Vlastimil Špalek’ here: http://bit.ly/VFHVSpalek

‘Voices for Humanity’ airs every Wednesday at 5 pm ET/PT on Scientology Network, DIRECTV Channel 320, AppleTV, Roku, fireTV and our mobile apps @ http://bit.ly/ScientologyNetworkiTunes or http://bit.ly/ScientologyNetworkGooglePlay.

Follow @ScientologyTV on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

The Czech Republic has the notorious reputation of being the largest producer of crystal meth in all of Europe. But one man is taking on the drug culture and fighting back by educating the country’s youth on the true and deadly dangers of drugs.

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Cannabis Education Videos

Medical Cannabis (drug) and Multiple Sclerosis: What does Science Say?



In this video I discuss Medical Cannabis (drugs) and Multiple Sclerosis. It was recorded during a live CME presentation (3/2019) for MS providers. I hope you find it educational.

COMMENT with your thoughts and questions below! I look forward to reading and responding!

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NOTE: Make sure to talk to your provider before ANY treatment decision. We hope to educate, empower and energize those impacted by Multiple Sclerosis. This channel consists of a collection of formal lectures and informal video clips about MS to help education others. These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational/educational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any of our videos. They are just to help educate you about the condition guys!

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Will CBD Make You Fail a Drug Test? Cannabis Educational Video – Cannapiece Group Inc



You may be familiar with the increased popularity of CBD and it’s potential health benefits. CBD and THC are two of the most famous cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant, but THC will get you high, and CBD won’t.

Even though CBD is not psychoactive, will using CBD make you fail a drug test?

Cannabis drug tests usually use method of a urine sample, in order to detect marijuana metabolites in the body. CBD Cannot produce a positive result on a drug test for cannabis!

That’s because drug test at screen for cannabis is looking for only one cannabinoid – That’s THCA the inactive form of THC. But don’t get ahead of yourself. If you only use CBD you may not be in the clear yet

Depending on the strain you use, high CBD strains can actually cause you to fail a drug test. What you may not know is that many of these strains still contain a high amount of THC, which will show up as a positive on a cannabis drug test.

Hemp-based CBD oils or pills are generally your best bet, as they usually contain around 0.3% of THC.

Therefore, these products shouldn’t cause you to fail a drug test as long as you use them in recommended doses. In order for a false positive to occur on a urine sample, you would need to ingest 1000 mg or more of CBD products.

The average CBD user consumes about 120 to 160 mg of CBD per day.

One thing to note, is that many CBD products on the market are unregulated. Therefore, make sure you know where you are buying your products from and what ingredients are in them, in order to stay out of trouble

We suggest investing in only lab tested CBD products and remembering to only take the recommended dosage

The good news is; using CBD on its own will not cause you to fail a drug test. However, it is important to be aware of the factors that potentially could.

Subscribe to our channel for more cannabis content, and hit the notification bell so you never miss an upload.

Thank you for watching our video based on cannabis information and cannabis education about the laws around Cannabis in Canada issued by health Canada and government of Canada about the cannabis industry in Canada.

Our effort is to educate and help anyone interested to learn more about Cannabis and cannabis industry especial the micro grower and micro grow cultivators in the cannabis field for medical cannabis.

Connect with us on our social media profiles.
Instagram: @cannapiece
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Email us at: info@cannapiece.ca

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Drug education for kids



RCMP say it’s more important than ever, with the ongoing opioid crisis and legalized marijuana, to educate young children about drugs.

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