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Cannabis Education Videos

Spice Up your Valentine's Day with Cannabis! | Tikun Olam California



Molly Peckler from Highly Devoted gives us three (3) tips on how to use cannabis to spice up your Valentine’s Day!

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Valentine’s Day
Happy Valentine’s Day
Cannabis
Marijuana
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Cannabis Education
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Cannabis Training Videos

Cannabis and Hemp Home Grow Training Program in San Diego California with Green Carpet Growing



Learn how to grow cannabis and hemp at home with our Cannabis and Hemp Training Program in San Diego, California. You’ll get an experiential education with our 20 hour training program that teaches and empowers you to set-up, maintain and optimize a home grow. Located at our personal gardens, the Green Carpet Growing “labs” are the perfect place for beginners to learn, practice and get prepared for successful hemp and cannabis cultivation at home.

Nothing compares to the hands-on gardening activities we offer and the personal instruction we provide. You’ll not only learn how to grow in soil, you’ll also learn hydroponics and aquaponics. You can also expect to learn the in’s and out’s of organic gardening methods, grow lights, grow tents, fans, watering, feeding, grow rooms, organic pest prevention, organic pest control, maximizing your yields, and everything else beginners need to know in order to succeed growing at home.

Every participant also gets a grow guide and the opportunity to ask all their questions while they practice cultivation techniques and get a hands-on education. If you are new to growing or need help, sign up today or anytime of the year.

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Cannabis Education

How California Cannabis Cultivators Grapple With Extreme Weather

No matter how much experience they have under their belt, cultivators who choose to grow cannabis in an outdoor environment are at the full mercy of Mother Nature.

Every few years, that constant battle intensifies for cannabis plants grown in the California sunshine, as they are forced to square off with El Niño, an irregularly occurring series of climatic changes that causes warmer ocean water throughout the Pacific Ocean, bringing heavier rainstorms and hotter temperatures to the West Coast.

El Niño is a phase of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a climate phenomenon caused by the interaction between the Earth’s atmosphere and the tropical Pacific. This interaction creates a sort of pendulum that swings between cooler and warmer sea surface temperatures, while also affecting weather conditions across the globe.

El Niño is a phase of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a climate phenomenon caused by the interaction between the Earth’s atmosphere and the tropical Pacific. (Shutterstock Photo)

It has an especially notable effect on California’s agricultural industry. That, of course, includes outdoor cannabis cultivation. When El Niño rolls around, it can inflict the Golden State with warmer-than-usual climate and intense amounts of rain, which could heavily affect outdoor cannabis grow operations. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), as of May 2019, there is a 65% chance of an El Niño weather pattern emerging during summer 2019.

Weather patterns created by El Niño have a major impact on cannabis grown in the Emerald Triangle, a cultivation-rich region in Northern California consisting of Humboldt, Mendocino, and Trinity counties. This region is historically known for its endless array of cannabis farms. On top of that, outdoor cultivators in the region must also closely monitor the general effects of climate change.

What Impact Does El Niño Have?

Not all phases of this weather cycle are necessarily bad for outdoor cultivators. La Niña is the colder phase to El Niño, and is responsible for cooling the water temperature in the Pacific Ocean. In Humboldt County, according to Kevin Jodrey, founder of Wonderland Nursery, a Humboldt County-based cannabis farm, a successful harvest can depend on what cycle the weather pattern is in.

“El Niño is going to dump massive amounts of water, while La Niña typically gives you a milder winter,” he said to Weedmaps News. “If we can have a milder winter, then we normally have an earlier spring. La Niña allows you to start your cycles earlier, but El Niño means you’re going to have some extreme water coming in.”

El Nino generally results in a lot of rain, while La Nina affords cultivators a mild winter. (Shutterstock Photo)

In a state where lengthy droughts are common, rain is a welcome sign to many Californians. It can also be beneficial to outdoor cannabis crops, depending on which stage of the growing process they’re in.

“I think we’re very inviting to small amounts of rain, especially in the vegetative stage all the way until June or July,” said Johnny Casali, a longtime Humboldt County resident and founder of Huckleberry Hill Farms, a local cannabis farm. “It washes the dust off the leaves, it cleans the plant, there’s a certain amount of nitrogen that comes in with fresh rain. I think the plants really enjoy it, we always see rigorous growth after rain.”

If heavy rainstorms strike during the flowering process, however, outdoor cannabis crops become extremely susceptible to mold. As buds form and the flower starts appear at the top of the plant, the humidity created by the rain can create moisture in these areas, leading to different types of mold. Rain can also add too much weight to the end of the branch, causing it to break off from the main stem. Even if the plants are housed in a greenhouse and largely protected from the elements, rain can still have an impact on the cultivation process.

“Greenhouses tend to fare a little bit better as far as combating earlier rains, but what happens is that all of the outside grounds and surrounding area gets really wet,” Casali said. “If the rain doesn’t beat your plants down, it’s the mold and stuff that can get you, too.”

Alongside almighty rainstorms, El Niño weather patterns can also generate some strong winds in the Humboldt County area. When these storms hit a cannabis farm, powerful wind can easily uproot cannabis plants and wreak havoc over an entire harvest.

Besides having to grapple with rain during El Nino, cultivators must also deal with stronger-than-average winds. (Shutterstock photo)

“We had a rain storm a couple of years ago that was tearing 10-pound [4.54 kilograms] plants right out of their cages and rolling them down the hill,” Jodrey said. “All of a sudden, if you have 5 inches [12.7 centimeters] of rain come down with an 80-mile-per-hour wind, there’s not much that can handle it.”

El Niño can also lead to higher temperatures, and rises in temperature could also affect plants — especially if the temperature doesn’t subside once the sun goes down. While having a climate-controlled greenhouse could help alleviate high temperatures, Casali explained that implementing such a system could be too costly for most farmers. Regardless, the temperature is another critical factor that all outdoor growers must monitor in order to optimize the final harvest.

“It’s just so much added stress to that plant. You can see the plant suffer, it definitely doesn’t thrive in those conditions,” Casali said. “You can definitely see the effects of the warmer weather negatively affecting the cannabis. Too hot is definitely not good.”

It’s not just El Niño weather patterns that are forcing growers in the Emerald Triangle to alter their long-established cultivation strategy. Regional climate change has also intensified, which has led to more sporadic weather patterns that are disastrous for some cannabis plants.

“Instead of getting 4 inches of rain distributed over the month, I get four inches of rain distributed over the course of an afternoon,” Jodrey said. “Those are the type of things that are catastrophic as a cultivator, and you have to basically “X” out a lot of the varietals that you used prior.”

How Cannabis Cultivators Overcome El Niño

In the event that El Niño creates droughtlike conditions in California, there are certain ways for outdoor cannabis growers to evade the brunt of the weather pattern’s negative effects. But there’s not an end-all-be-all approach. Cultivators take different approaches depending on the region, strain type, growing methodology, and personal preference.

“It seems like every farmer goes about it a little differently. Some of them read the Farmer’s Almanac, some of them are not so superstitious and just play it however the cards roll out,” said Casali. “Towards late August, you really start to monitor the weather patterns and start to predict when those earlier rains are going to start rolling in.”

Every cannabis farmer approaches inclement weather differently, but when harsh weather hits, they must all cope. (Photo by Gina Coleman/Weedmaps)

For Casali, the trick is to grow smaller plants that require a shorter growing season. This allows him to start the process during the warm season and complete the flowering process before mid-September rains usually pour down in the Humboldt region.

“I think it’s really important for those people to start early when the weather is warm, you know, in May or even early June you can start your seeds,” said Casali. “The shorter the growing season for you, the less amount of time they have to be affected by something like that.”

At the Wonderland Nursery, however, Jodrey takes an extremely methodical approach to his expansive cultivation process. Before dealing with potentially harsh rain or winds from El Niño, the Humboldt County-based grower artificially creates the potentially disastrous weather patterns himself. This is all a part of his research and development (R&D), which entails testing a wide range of varietals to figure out what they can handle.    

During R&D, the cultivator sprays down his sample plants with massive amounts of water during flowering to see which can withstand the heavy beatdown and are not susceptible to mold.

“I create artificial problems by hosing them down and spraying the buds to find out if I can break the plant or make it rot,” he explained. “It’s really just a matter of trying to understand the issues that you might face.”

The seasoned cultivator uses seeds during the trial-and-error process and moves onto clones when it’s time for large-scale production. While seeds have genes from parents strains, they also have the potential to evolve and adopt different growth characteristics that make them better suited for harsh weather conditions. Once he discovers which varietals show the most resistance to rain, wind, and high temperatures, Jodrey knows which plants he can count on even if his farm is inundated with undesirable weather.

Kevin Jodrey, founder of Wonderland Nursery, starts with seeds then clones the varietals that fare best against his manmade weather conditions. (Photo by Gina Coleman/Weedmaps)

“What I can do is mitigate my losses and diversify my varietals so that I have enough different things that have windows of opportunity and different levels of resistance, so that I have the greatest chance of harvesting something,” Jodrey explained. “Some years are incredible and you harvest everything, but some years are brutal and you don’t harvest too much.”

For amateurs just earning their stripes in the outdoor cultivation world, the best way to master the art of growing and avoid climate-related calamities is to become familiar with the weather cycles and the surrounding environment. Jodrey’s recommendation to entry-level growers is to talk to neighboring farmers, attend local cannabis cultivation meetings, such as the regional chapter of the California Growers Association, and use the internet to find varietals that are best-suited to withstand the potentially harsh elements that could strike in that specific area.

“Nowadays, everyone is communicating it’s not so clandestine, you can ask people that have historically cultivated what works here,” he explained. “That’s the easiest way, because, ultimately, amateurs are just masters at the beginning. It’s always a progression.”



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420 College 10 years in the industry helping start cannabis business all over California!



Here at 420 College, we specialize in helping start your cannabis business. We start with education first!

https://420college.org

EDUCATION / LICENSING / MANAGEMENT

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How to Get a Medical Marijuana Card in California

If you live in California, you may wonder if it’s worth going through the process of getting cleared to grow, possess, or buy medical marijuana in a state where recreational use is legal. There are at least a couple of good reasons if you have one of the qualifying conditions to become a medical patient in the Golden State.

Medical use of marijuana has been legal since the 1996 passage of Proposition 215, the Compassionate Use Act. After Proposition 64 in 2016 legalized adult-use marijuana, the legislature passed the passed the Medical and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA), creating a combined regulatory system for both medical and recreational marijuana.

While adults can buy marijuana just about anywhere in the state, patients with a doctor’s recommendation can grow or possess larger quantities of marijuana than recreational users. MAUCRSA enables adults 21 and older to possess up to 1 ounce, or 28.5 grams of flower, up to 8 grams of concentrate and up to six living cannabis plants in their private residence. A qualified patient or primary caregiver may possess up to 8 ounces, or 227 grams, of dried marijuana per qualified patient, and may maintain up to six mature or 12 immature marijuana plants.

A doctor’s recommendation is required for those younger than 21 to purchase marijuana, and a county-issued medical marijuana ID card gives buyers a tax exemption on purchases.

 

California’s Qualifying Conditions

  • Anorexia
  • Arthritis
  • Cachexia, or wasting syndrome
  • Cancer
  • Chronic pain
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Migraine
  • Persistent muscle spasms, including spasms associated with multiple sclerosis
  • Seizures, including seizures associated with epilepsy
  • Severe nausea
  • Any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits the ability of the person to conduct a major life activity as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the patient’s safety or physical or mental health.

Applying for a Medical Card in California

Patients must get a Medical Marijuana Identification Card (MMIC) through a county program, not through an attending physician or an evaluation center. The county offices and contact information page provides the contact information for the MMIC program in each participating county.

Patients must reside in the county where their application is submitted and fill out an Application/Renewal Form. Counties require a copy of a medical recommendation, proof of identity – that can be a valid California Department of Motor Vehicle driver’s license, ID card or other government-issued photo ID card – and proof of residency, such as a rental or mortgage agreement, utility bill, or California DMV motor vehicle registration. Fees required by county programs vary, but cannot exceed $100.

Medi-Cal recipients receive a 50 percent fee reduction, and fees are waived for low-income patients participating in the County Medical Services Program. Counties have 30 days to verify an application and five days to make the MMIC available. Minors can apply as a patient or caregiver under certain conditions, and minors can apply for themselves as qualified patients if they are lawfully emancipated or have declared self-sufficiency status.

Appointing a Caregiver

A primary caregiver is defined as someone who is responsible for the housing, health, or safety of a qualified patient. Primary caregivers must be at least 18 years old or be an emancipated minor or the parent of a minor child who is a qualified patient. Primary caregivers must apply in person along with the patient, and provide proof of identity. Those with more than one qualified patient must reside in the same county. Patients or primary caregiver may have no more than 8 ounces, or 227 grams, of dried marijuana per qualified patient and may maintain up to six mature or 12 immature marijuana plants.

Acquiring Your Medicine

Patients can grow their own marijuana, or purchase it from licensed dispensaries. It’s illegal to sell without a license. Medical marijuana dispensaries can be found as far north as Eureka to as far south as San Diego.  

Rules for Out-of-State Patients

State law allows for non-resident adults who have a valid driver’s license, state ID, or federal ID to purchase marijuana for recreational use. Both resident and non-resident patients need a valid doctor’s recommendation from a physician licensed in California to purchase medical cannabis products in California. Neither medical nor adult-use cannabis are allowed to cross state borders, so cannabis cannot go into or be taken out of California.



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California cannabis business licensing available!



Here at 420 College, we specialize in helping start your cannabis business. We start with education first! We have cannabis business seminars in San Diego, Pasadena, Los Angeles Fresno and Sacramento. We have been in the industry since 2009 and still going strong.

https://420college.org

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The Cannabis Education Club at Chaffey College in Rancho Cucamonga California #1 April 6, 2018



An introduction to the blueprint for making history on campuses worldwide! Starting right here between the Inland Empire and Los Angeles. Club President JP Pazmino talks about upcoming event on 4/20 on campus 10AM-3PM Friday.
CoHosted by PR Rep. Kris [ @jawhoney ] Tashjian (UC Irvine Psychology and Criminology Alum, Currently Theatre/ Broadcasting/ Journalism Student).

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Cannabis Training Videos

2018 California Cannabis Cultivator Regulations Overview



Learn about the State of California’s Cannabis Cultivator regulations.

Connect with Sonia Luna and ask for your FREE Accounting Diagnostic by emailing us at:
Info@avivaspectrum.com

Link to the CalCannabis Cultivation training site:
https://www.cdfa.ca.gov/calcannabis/training/

Link to the California Track and Trace FAQ Document:

Click to access Track%20and%20Trace%20FAQ_1.10.18.pdf

Application Checklist:

Click to access 17-188_application_checklist.pdf

Link to the sample Invoice/Shipping Manifest document Cultivators:

Click to access 2017%201221_FINAL_Sample_Sales%20Invoice%20-%20Shipping%20Manifest%20-%20Fillable%20PDF.pdf

Link to the State Regulations on Weight (Emergency Regs):

Click to access Proposed%20Emergency%20Regulations%20Final_12.12.17.pdf

LINK to the California Environmental Reporting System: https://cers.calepa.ca.gov/

LINK Online Alarm renewal access for Los Angeles:
http://finance.lacity.org/permits

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Cannabis Education Videos

New California laws cover immigration, marijuana, education, criminal justice



New California laws cover immigration, marijuana, education, criminal justice.

By Don Thompson, Associated Press

California state lawmakers in 2017 passed nearly 900 bills that Gov. Jerry Brown then signed into law. Most of them take effect Monday. The new laws cover topics ranging from the Trump administration’s immigration crackdown, to the state’s new recreational cannabis market, to the price of a college education.

Here are some of the laws taking effect with the new year:
Immigration

• Police are no longer be able to ask people about their immigration status or participate in federal immigration enforcement actions under a law making California a sanctuary state. The law also allows jail officials to transfer inmates to federal immigration authorities only if they have been convicted of certain crimes.

• Immigration officials will need a warrant to access workplaces or employee records and landlords will be barred from disclosing tenants’ citizenship.

• University officials are prohibited from cooperating with immigration officers.

• Law enforcement officials are barred from detaining a crime victim or witness only because of an actual or suspected immigration violation, or turning them over to immigration authorities without a warrant.

Cannabis

• Sales of recreational marijuana are legal under a 2016 voter initiative that created the nation’s biggest legal drug market.

• Driving a motor vehicle after smoking and ingesting marijuana is illegal, just as it’s already unlawful for drivers or passengers to drink alcohol while driving.

On the job

• The state minimum wage will increase to $10.50 per hour for businesses with 25 or fewer employees and to $11 per hour for those with 26 or more employees.

• Small businesses with 20 to 49 people will have to offer 12 weeks of unpaid maternity and paternity leave to employees.

• Employers can’t ask job applicants about their past salaries, a measure designed to narrow the pay gap between men and women.

• California will become the 10th state to require both public- and private-sector employers of five or more employees to delay background checks and inquiries about job applicants’ conviction records until they have made a conditional job offer, a measure known as “ban the box.”

• Those arrested but not convicted of a crime may ask a judge to seal their records, a move advocates say will help them get hired.

Health care

• Pharmaceutical companies must give advance notice before big price increases, although a drug makers’ trade group is suing to block the measure.

• It is illegal to deny admission to long-term care facilities based on gender identity or sexual orientation or to repeatedly fail to use a resident’s preferred name or pronoun.
Climate change

• Old-fashioned incandescent light bulbs will start disappearing from shelves because they can no longer meet energy efficiency standards under a 2007 federal law. That leaves compact fluorescent lights or light-emitting diode bulbs

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Cannabis Education Videos

Breaking News CSB – New California laws cover immigration, marijuana, education, criminal justice –



Breaking News CSB – New California laws cover immigration, marijuana, education, criminal justice – Orange County Register
Desc: By Don Thompson, Associated Press California state lawmakers in 2017 passed nearly 900 bills that Gov.Jerry Brown then signed into law.Most of them take effect Monday.The new laws cover topics ranging from the Trump administration’s immigration crackdown, to the state’s new recreational cannabis market, to the price of a college education.Here are some of the laws taking effect with the new year: Immigration • Police are no longer be able to ask people about their immigration status or participate in federal immigration enforcement actions under a law making California a sanctuary state.The law also allows jail officials to transfer inmates to federal immigration authorities only if they have been convicted of certain crimes.• Immigration officials will need a warrant to access workplaces or employee records and landlords will be barred from disclosing tenants’ citizenship.• University officials are prohibited from cooperating with immigration officers.• Law enforcement officials are barred from detaining a crime victim or witness only because of an actual or suspected immigration violation, or turning them over to immigration authorities without a warrant.Cannabis • Sales of recreational marijuana are legal under a 2016 voter initiative that created the nation’s biggest legal drug market.• Driving a motor vehicle after smoking and ingesting marijuana is illegal, just as it’s already unlawful for drivers or passengers to drink alcohol while driving.• A separate law that took effect in June bars the possession of open containers of cannabis while driving.On the job • The state minimum wage will increase to $10.50 per hour for businesses with 25 or fewer employees and to $11 per hour for those with 26 or more employees.• Small businesses with 20 to 49 people will have to offer 12 weeks of unpaid maternity and paternity leave to employees.• Employers can’t ask job applicants about their past salaries, a measure designed to narrow the pay gap between men and women.• California will become the 10th state to require both public- and private-sector employers of five or more employees to delay background checks and inquiries about job applicants’ conviction records until they have made a conditional job offer, a measure known as “ban the box.”• Those arrested but not convicted of a crime may ask a judge to seal their records, a move advocates say will help them get hired.Health care • Pharmaceutical companies must give advance notice before big price increases, although a drug makers’ trade group is suing to block the measure.• It is illegal to deny admission to long-term care facilities based on gender identity or sexual orientation or to repeatedly fail to use a resident’s preferred name or pronoun.Climate change • Old-fashioned incandescent light bulbs will start disappearing from shelves because they can no longer meet energy efficiency standards under a 2007 federal law.That leaves compact fluorescent lights or light-emitting diode bulbs under the r
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